Skyypilot- Composition- Production of “Unforgotten”- (Part 8)

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Skyypilot- Composition- Production of “Unforgotten”- (Part 8)

In Part 8, we’ll cover:

  • Export/Import Wav files of Sub mixes
  • Recording Guitar in Waveform 9 with Amplitude 4
  • Choosing Guitar presets/Rendering Wav files
  • Playback

Export Wav files of Sub Mixes

Now,  in Part 8, we will free up some of the computer’s resources by exporting sub mix wav files of the Drums/Percussion group and the Sample Tank 3 group.   First, solo the Drums/Percussion sub mix and select “Export” then “Render to file”.  I usually render to 24-bit file.  Disable the  Waves Studio Rack in the master bus before the render, or you’ll double-up on it later.   Make sure you put it in  the project  “Export” folder so you can easily locate it.   (Hit “T” after choosing the original sub mix track location to place the new track directly below it).  Next, Import the file to the empty track.  Also, add the Aux Sends (1&2) to the track, as we’re keeping the effects Aux Returns separate.

Let’s get all of our levels and panning set for the Sample Tank 3 sub mix.  We will then do the same thing in soloing, rendering, and importing  this instrumental sub mix  (minus the channel 1 Drum kit which is in the Drum/Percussion sub  mix).  Add a new track (“T”) below the sub mix track to import the ST3 wav file into.  After its import, I inserted Waves J37 to warm it up a bit.

Recording Guitar in Waveform 9 with Amplitude 4

Next, we’ll use IK Multimedia’s Amplitude 4 to record rhythm guitar into Waveform.  The  cool thing about Amplitude is that if you don’t like a sound AFTER the fact, you can still change it!  We’ll record the part with a pre-selected preset on Amplitude.

Choosing Guitar presets/Rendering Wav files

Then, we’ll add 9-yes, 9 Tracks underneath the  guitar.  Select the first guitar wav file, then in Properties at the bottom right “Select all Clips in the Same Track”.  We’ll then “Render Selected Clips” at the bottom of Properties.  Before doing this, however,  be sure to disable the Studio Rack in the Master bus.  The new wav file is created on top of the original, so just drag and drop it into one of the newly-created empty tracks.  I inserted  an IK Multimedia TR5 Classic EQ, along with a Waves ADT effect (for some phase-shifting).  Go back to the original track with Amplitude 4 and pick another sound.  Select all in track, render new wav file, and drag and drop to an empty track below.  Fill up all the rest of the added guitar tracks with different-sounding rendered files.

Well, we obviously don’t want all of those identical guitar parts with different sounds all playing at the same time, so now is the time to mix-and-match the parts to our liking.  The clips can be broken up by selecting, then hitting the / key.  This splits them at the slash.  From there, we can shorten by dragging the ends, lose sections as we go, etc.

Playback

Now that the parts are chosen, let’s hear the playback!  Be sure to click here for the companion YouTube video (added soon).  This is starting to take some shape…Back to work on Part 9!

Author’s note:  I have not been compensated for any products mentioned above.

© 2018 J. Mark Witters   Skyypilot.com

 

 

 

 

 

Music Adventures Now-Technology

Just Do It!

Starting Out

Technology can prepare anyone  to complete a journey.  You must take the first steps and the momentum will keep you going.  

While growing up, I discovered the joy of music and that it has only grown over the years.  I knew what I wanted to hear, but how do I create it? Technology is the answer.

Well, I knew yours truly was not the most gifted of musicians, so my task was to exploit my God-given talents.  I’ve always enjoyed writing, so I wrote poetry of all sorts  (mostly  drivel, but you have to start somewhere!).   I spent my early years learning trumpet, then music theory. Then, I started to learn guitar and put together a lot of stuff (Listened to James Taylor, Miles Davis, the Beatles,  Frank Zappa, and everything in between, so you can only imagine what I came up with!)  

In 1971, I went  to college when synthesizers were first coming out. There was a synthesizer room you actually had to schedule to use! I was able to figure out how to use patch cords (!) to get my acoustic pick-up-mounted guitar to play through an  ARP 2600 synthesizer, unheard-of in my limited sphere.  It was then I decided I wouldn’t become a music teacher, and left to pursue my adventure.  

This was 1973, and did not want to play in a cover band, nor could I find like-minded people, so worked night blue-collar jobs obtained a basic 4-track studio, instruments, and started writing and recording my original music.  It wasn’t pretty, but a start, nonetheless. A lot of isolation, but it was a learning experience for me.

Listen with Open Ears

Along the way, my ears were kept open to all music.  My natural limited-attention span would not let my chosen form of communication be boxed-in.  Rock, jazz, classical, Motown, blues, avant-garde, folk, and everything in between were all part of that gumbo.  Maybe  I didn’t know what I was doing, but kept at it anyway.

I studied “Music Business” in the mid-eighties and knew I wouldn’t fit into any of that mess, so kept my head down and learned Windows,  Finale music notation, VST, and midi-sequencing.  All this kept me busy through the nineties.  Technology is starting to work its magic!

Keeping my ears (and mind) open, I was asked by our daughter (Kerri Hirsch Upton)  to produce her drum/vocal band Spiral Rhythm’s first CD, so I did.  It was recorded right in our living room.  Ric Neyer and Kerri wanted to form an offshoot band from Spiral Rhythm, so  Skyypilot was born.  I joined Spiral Rhythm, and met Steve Collins (he literally built the stage we played on), who had a band named Moonstruck.  He needed a second guitarist, so I joined them for a time. Some nights, I would play three consecutive sets with three different groups!   Steve was a great guy who encouraged me to keep recording, so  I did!

What Technology Brings

Using an early Roland 16-track digital recorder, I recorded the first seven Spiral Rhythm albums, the first three Skyypilot albums, and “The Balance”, a fine album by Heather Jinmaku.  Since 2006, I have been recording all material “in the box” (on computer).  

Technology has been huge.  Now, I can use plugins for a tiny fraction of the cost (and space) of the original hardware.  I have software that replicates pretty much everything the Beatles used on their Abbey Road recordings.  I have software (Amplitude 4) that lets me record a guitar part with dry signal, then manipulate it in any way, then back to original if I don’t like the amp or effects. My music can be released online and streaming almost instantly.  

I decided to make my own Skyypilot music videos, so I subscribed to Videoblocks and began editing downloaded content using Windows Movie Maker.  I set up a website and just started blogging, so it is always a work-in-progress.  No longer doing the blue-collar thing, I am now diving into even more challenges.  One can try to prepare, but there’s nothing like going in there and thrashing it out.  You learn from your mistakes, believe me… Just do it!

Authors note: I received no compensation for any products mentioned above.

© 2018   J. Mark Witters        Skyypilot.com